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CPLPEJ Symposium: The War on Drugs – March 13, 2013

Published on February 27, 2013 by in Featured
Please also see http://www.paperlesspost.com/events/3716354-675632c3/replies/preview#paper/front/0
 
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A Gun is A Gun

Author: Toussaint Cummings, J.D. Candidate, Class of 2014 

Between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, Mayor Michael Bloomberg got the better of the gun ban argument during the second debate.

In response to an audience member’s question about limiting the availability of assault weapons, both candidates took the opportunity to wax tangential[1] about education and family values.  To be fair, the President hewed closer to the line by addressing the rampant handgun violence in Chicago, and saying that weapons designed for war should not be on American streets.  Mitt Romney started with one toe on terra firma and then rapidly ascended into the stratosphere.  He began with a brief statement about no new gun laws.  After that, he correlated single-family homes with poverty and poverty with violence and then, predictably, questioned the wisdom of the ATF’s Fast and Furious program.

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The Candidates on Abortion

Only the Supreme Court has the power to overturn Roe v. Wade, but the President has the power to change the Supreme Court by nominating Judges.  On the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, Obama made a statement of his continued support and goal to protect this “constitutional right.”  Mitt Romney has said “ I am pro-life and believe that abortion should be limited to only instances of rape, incest or to safe the life of the mother.  I support the reversal of Roe v. wade, because it is bad law and bad medicine.”

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Exporting America: China and the Presidential Debates

Author: Frank Rosenfield, J.D. Candidate, Class of 2014 

In years past, national attention has been focused on foreign affairs or problems within our own country, but this election has spotlighted a rather unique issue.  Concerns with the future of China and its impact on American business and labor, including intellectual property, unemployment, manufacturing, and trade, have dominated this presidential debate, and each nominee’s particular views will have a resounding effect on who is ultimately elected next month.  Both President Obama and Governor Romney have tried to appear as if they are taking a tough stance against a China that is practicing “unfairly” in the global marketplace, but each side has different perspectives on this growing problem.

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Obama and Romney’s Divergent Views on Energy

While President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney did not comment on climate change or the environment during the Presidential Debates, they did clash over their views on energy.

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Obama and Romney’s Final Swing

Author: Alex Dombroff, J.D. Candidate, Class of 2014 

Five days removed from being voted President-elect in 2008, Barack Obama appeared on 60 Minutes for a wide-ranging interview, touching on everything from the economy, to the dog he had promised his daughters upon the family’s arrival at the White House.  Still, the most lasting sound bite from the soon-to-be President’s television appearance came when asked about the lack of a playoff in college football, Obama threw down.

“I’m gonna throw my weight around a little bit,” he said. “It’s the right thing to do.”

It’s hard to tell exactly what role, if any, President Obama had in the Death to the BCS*, college football’s current postseason system that will be retired in favor of a four team playoff starting in 2014-2015.  No matter, however, as sports fans got what they want and they had support from the leader of the free world. Read more…

 
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The Candidates’ Positions on Education Reform

Author: Justin Vine, J.D. Candidate, Class of 2014 

In a presidential election revolving around economic issues, it is easy to neglect the candidate’s perspectives on education reform. The three debates laid out the party’s positions on the economy, health care, and foreign affairs and were a great way of informing the public on the candidate’s ideals. However, the debates failed to extensively discuss the candidate’s outlook on education.  Ironically, the two parties have a distinct view on making our education system prosper into the future.

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Election Series Event: Immigration

Join us for our final Election Series Event on Wednesday October 31st.

 
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Binders Full of Women

Author: Nick Bonham, J.D. Candidate, Class of 2014

             “As a hip, modern woman I thought I would try out this binder.  Unfortunately, it is not large enough for both my vast file of healthy, family-friendly recipes *and* my Master’s degree plus my curriculum vitae,” says Violet from Seattle, WA in her Amazon.com review of the Avery 1-inch Economy Binder.

            On the morning of October 17, mere hours after the second presidential debate, the Internet exploded with snarky comments and new “memes” arising from Governor Romney’s now infamous “binders full of women” remark.  In fairness to Gov. Romney, here is the quote in context, where he is fielding a question regarding earnings inequality between men and women and explaining how he approached the dearth of women in his cabinet:

“And – and so we – we took a concerted effort to go out and find women who had backgrounds that could be qualified to become members of our cabinet.  I went to a number of women’s groups and said, can you help us find folks?  And they brought us whole binders full of – of women.  I was proud of the fact that after I staffed my cabinet and my senior staff that the University of New York in Albany did a survey of all 50 states and concluded that mine had more women in senior leadership positions than any other state in America.”

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Election Series Event: Tax, Labor and the Economy

Join us for our second Election Series Event!

 
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